Cross-reacting antigens and neoantigens; with implications for autoimmunity and cancer immunity
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Cross-reacting antigens and neoantigens; with implications for autoimmunity and cancer immunity

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Published by Williams & Wilkins in Baltimore .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Antigens -- Congresses.,
  • Immunity -- Congresses.

Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementEditor, JohnJ. Trentin.
ContributionsTrentin, John Joseph., National Research Council (U.S.). Committee on Tissue Transplantation.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsQR185.A6
The Physical Object
Paginationxvi, 122 p. :
Number of Pages122
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL19584462M

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  This book is a collection of papers and related discussions from a conference devoted to consideration of cross-reacting antigens and neoantigens, and implications of these chemical substances in autoimmunity, cancer, and transplantation immunology. Papers are necessarily from several disciplines; some presentations are by: FULL TEXT Journal: Postgraduate medical journal[/09] Cross-Reacting Antigens and Neoantigens (with Implications for Autoimmunity and Cancer Immunity). Immunology. (Book Reviews: Cross-Reacting Antigens and Neoantigens. With Implications for Autoimmunity and Cancer Immunity. Proceedings of a conference, Washington, D.C., May )Author: Paul Maurer. Cross-Reacting Antigens and Neoantigens (with Implications for Autoimmunity and Cancer Immunity) By Topics: Book Review.

Experimental autoimmune spondylodiscitis associated with type II collagen induced arthritis Cross-Reacting Antigens and Neoantigens. With Implications for Autoimmunity and Cancer Immunity. The crossroads between cancer immunity and autoimmunity: antibodies to self antigens. Monica Benvenuto 1, Rosanna Mattera 1, Laura Masuelli 2, Ilaria Tresoldi 1, Maria Gabriella Giganti 1, Giovanni Vanni Frajese 3, Vittorio Manzari 1, Andrea Modesti 1, 4, Roberto Bei 1, 4. 1 Department of Clinical Sciences and Translational Medicine, University of Rome, Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy, 2.   1. Breast cancer tumorigenesis and classification. Breast cancer is both the most common type of cancer and the most frequent cause of cancer mortality in women [], with a global burden of 2 new cases (% of all new cancer cases) and deaths (% of all cancer deaths) in [].The most common presentation of breast cancer is invasive ductal carcinoma . Title(s): Cross-reacting antigens and neoantigens; with implications for autoimmunity and cancer immunity. A conference sponsored by the Committee on Tissue Transplantation, Division of Medical Sciences, National Academy of Sciences-National Research Council, Washington, D. .

Catherine Wu, MD, and Patrick Ott, MD, PhD, are studying the use of neoantigen vaccines in cancer. Scientists have long tried to create cancer vaccines that contain a distinctive antigen – some molecule or part of the cancer cell which would spur an immune response against the tumor, while leaving normal organs and tissues in the body unscathed.   During their development and progression tumors acquire numerous mutations that, when translated into proteins give rise to neoantigens that can be recognized by T cells. Initially, neoantigens were not recognized as preferred targets for cancer immunotherapy due to their enormous diversity and the therefore limited options to develop “one fits all” pharmacologic solutions. The ability of cancer cells to elicit an immune response depends on several factors, including their expression of neoantigens. A recent analysis by Gunnar Rätsch of the ETH Zurich, Department of Computer Science, Zurich, Switzerland and colleagues from the Cancer Genome Atlas Research Network reveals some clues on questions such as how many antigens tumour cells express or do . Antigen cloning studies carried out over the past 25 years have led to the demonstration that T cells from patients with a variety of cancer types recognize mutated gene products ; however, the conventional expression cloning methods used in these studies were time consuming and labor intensive, limiting the applicability of this approach for.