Do we really need a new international monetary compact?
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Do we really need a new international monetary compact? by Maurice Obstfeld

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Published by National Bureau of Economic Research in Cambridge, MA .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Monetary policy -- International cooperation.,
  • International finance.,
  • Economic stabilization -- International cooperation.

Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementMaurice Obstfeld, Kenneth Rogoff.
SeriesNBER working paper series -- no. 7864, Working paper series (National Bureau of Economic Research) -- working paper no. 7864.
ContributionsRogoff, Kenneth S., National Bureau of Economic Research.
The Physical Object
Pagination38 p. ;
Number of Pages38
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL22406324M

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Is it a problem, however, that international welfare spillover effects seldom receive much consideration in the design of monetary reforms? Surprisingly, the answer may be no. Under plausible conditions, as domestic rules improve and international financial markets become more complete, the Nash and cooperative monetary rule setting games converge. In recent years, many countries have instituted monetary reforms aimed at improving anti-inflation credibility. Get this from a library! Do we really need a new international monetary compact?. [Maurice Obstfeld; Kenneth S Rogoff; National Bureau of Economic Research.] -- Abstract: In recent years, many countries have instituted monetary reforms aimed at improving anti-inflation credibility. Is it a problem, however, that international welfare spillover effects seldom. Books Advanced Search New Releases Best Sellers & More Children's Books Textbooks Textbook Rentals Best Books of the Month New, Used & Rental Textbooks › Business & Finance What Do We Need to Know About the International Monetary System? byCited by:

Under plausible conditions, as domestic rules improve and international financial markets become more complete, the Nash and cooperative monetary rule setting games converge. We base our analysis on a utility-theoretic sticky-wage (new open economy macroeconomics) model; the question we pose simply could not have been adequately formulated using earlier models of monetary : Maurice Obstfeld and Kenneth Rogoff. Maurice Obstfeld & Kenneth Rogoff, "Do We Really Need a New International Monetary Compact?," NBER Working Papers , National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc. Kenneth Rogoff, "International Institutions for Reducing Global Financial Instability," NBER Working Papers , National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc. Why we need an International Monetary System. The present global currency system does not really work. There are many problems that may become dangerous to . Obstfeld M., and Kenneth Rogoff (), “Do We Really Need a New International Monetary Compact”, NBER, Working Paper Series no. , August. Obstfeld, M. (), “International capital mobility in the s”, CEPR discussion paper no.

Do we really need a new international monetary compact? The EMS, the EMU and the transition to a common currency: Esta vez es distinto: ocho siglos de necedad financiera: Estimating the efficiency gains of debt restructuring: Evolution and performance of . Zhou Xiaochuan: Reform the international monetary system Essay by Dr Zhou Xiaochuan, Governor of the People’s Bank of China, 23 March * * * The outbreak of the current crisis and its spillover in the world have confronted us with a long-existing but still unanswered question, i.e., what kind of international reserve currencyFile Size: 19KB. The International Monetary System: Where Are We and Where Do We Need to Go? Prepared by Rakesh Mohan, Michael Debabrata Patra and Muneesh Kapur1 November Abstract The North Atlantic financial crisis of has spurred renewed interest in reforming the international monetary system, which has been malfunctioning in many Size: KB. Under plausible conditions, as domestic rules improve and international financial markets become more complete, the Nash and cooperative monetary rule setting games converge. We base our analysis on a utility-theoretic sticky-wage (new open economy macroeconomics) model; the question we pose simply could not have been adequately formulated using earlier models of monetary by: